King tides draw crowds

People gathered along Highway 101 at Keady Wayside in Waldport on Saturday, Jan. 11, where the ocean, aided by a king tide, tossed debris into the park and the parking lot, necessitating the closure of the park until city crews could complete cleanup. (Photo by Cheri Brubaker) A group of people watches the crashing waves on Saturday afternoon, Jan. 11, from the Rocky Creek State Scenic Viewpoint just north of Cape Perpetua. (Photo by Jeremy Burke) A buoy belonging to Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center washed ashore near the North Jetty of Yaquina Bay in Newport before being retrieved on Sunday, Jan. 12. (Photo courtesy of Oregon State Parks)

LINCOLN COUNTY — This past weekend saw king tides and a spectacular storm in Lincoln County, along with many storm watchers.

Jered Mangini, manager of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s Beverly Beach State Park management unit, said both Boiler Bay and Rocky Creek state scenic viewpoints were over capacity this weekend.

“Folks parked up and down the entrance and exit lanes,” he said, noting that both parks are beautiful spots to watch the forces of nature. “It was magical and glorious,” Mangini said.

Perhaps more importantly, Mangini added, “I didn’t see anyone putting themselves in danger,” which he said is always a risk at the ocean.

In Lincoln City, the city and the police department acted proactively to ensure safety.

“All city beach access points were obstructed with caution tape by city workers,” said Lincoln City Police Department Sergeant Randy Weaver.

While some people did make their way down to the water in Lincoln City, Weaver said they were invariably reported to police, and officers were dispatched to advise them of the danger and ask them to leave.

Keady Wayside, a park along Highway 101 in Waldport, was closed on Sunday, Jan. 12, by city crews when rocks and debris were tossed onto the road.

In South Beach, a navigational bell buoy washed up three miles south of the jetty on Saturday, Jan. 11. On Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 14, state parks was working with the United States Coast Guard and a local contractor with an excavator and trailer at South Beach State Park to retrieve the buoy as the tide receded, said State Parks Ocean Shores Coordinator Jay Sennewald.

Along the North Jetty of Yaquina Bay, a buoy belonging to Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center washed ashore and was recovered on Sunday.

And, as the waves crashed, there were many people representing the King TidesProject, a worldwide effort that “helps people all over the world understand how sea-level rise will impact their lives, according to the website, kingtides.net.

At the local level, the Oregon King Tides Photo Initiative is in its 10th year of documenting the impacts of sea-level rise.

"Understanding and documenting the extent and impacts of especially high tide events is becoming a popular way to highlight the need to prepare for the effects of future climate conditions,” oregonkingtides.net explains regarding the project.

Tasked specifically to capture photos of areas that depict flooding and erosion where the tide’s impact is shown “against familiar landmarks like buildings, jetties, bridges, roads, seawalls, shorelines, beach infrastructure or estuary shorelines,” photographers were out in full force along local beaches.

Photographers traveled up and down the coast, documenting the tides and marveling at the power of the ocean.

More information about tides can be found at tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/education.html. The next king tide event will be Feb. 8-10.

 

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People gathered along Highway 101 at Keady Wayside in Waldport on Saturday, Jan. 11, where the ocean, aided by a king tide, tossed debris into the park and the parking lot, necessitating the closure of the park until city crews could complete cleanup. (Photo by Cheri Brubaker) A group of people watches the crashing waves on Saturday afternoon, Jan. 11, from the Rocky Creek State Scenic Viewpoint just north of Cape Perpetua. (Photo by Jeremy Burke) A buoy belonging to Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center washed ashore near the North Jetty of Yaquina Bay in Newport before being retrieved on Sunday, Jan. 12. (Photo courtesy of Oregon State Parks)


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